RSS

Monthly Archives: March 2012

Japanese Style Broiled Salmon Steak

This is a simple recipe for those days when you want some fish for a quick and healthy meal. You can marinate the fish for an extended time for the best flavor, but even a quick marinate is quite adequate in my experience. I made this for Sunday lunch, and it was both easy and delicious even though the fish was only marinated for about 45 minutes. The proportions of the marinate shown below is enough for 24 ounces of fish. If you are planning on making only 1 fish steak, you can reserve the rest of the marinade and leave it in the fridge for later use. It is a very versatile marinate that can work for different types of fish, although you would probably have the best results with oily fish such as salmon, black cod, mackerel, and Chilean sea bass.

Ingredients:

  • 4 salmon steaks (about 24 ounces total)
  • 1/4 cup mirin
  • 1/4 cup soy sauce
  • 1/4 cup sake
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 tables grated fresh ginger

Directions:

  1. Combine all ingredients, except salmon, into a small saucepan and heat until the sugar dissolves. Set aside to let cool
  2. Marinate the fish in the sauce for as long as you have time for – hopefully at least 30 minutes and up to overnight
  3. Remove salmon steaks and arrange on a baking dish or fish griller, making sure to remove any excess marinade
  4. Turn on broiler to high setting. Broil fish at about 6 inches away from the fire. Turn fish over once, after about 10 minutes. The fish should be done in 15-20 minutes of total cooking time
  5. Enjoy!
 

Tags: , , ,

Sake-Steamed Clams (Asari no sakamushi)

Clams are arguably some of the most naturally sweet seafood out there. Some may think that it is a lot of work to prepare a dish from live clams, but as shown here, it is actually not that difficult. Here, we show a popular Japanese way to cook them. Sake-steamed clams is typically eaten in a Japanese izakaya setting as an appetizer or a tapas style small dish. You can think of it as a soup or broth as well, as the clam juice all end up in the cooking liquid. We always end up slurping up every last bit of liquid from the bowl!

Ingredients:

  • 1 lb clams
  • 2 green onions/scallions, chopped
  • 4 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 2 inches long Kombu, optional
  • 1/2 cup sake
  • 1/2 cup water
  • Dash of soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon Mirin, optional

Directions:

  1. Put the clams in a bowl in cold water with salt, and put the bowl in the fridge for 2-3 hours. This supposedly causes the clams to spit out any sand particles. Before cooking, scrub the shells thoroughly with a stiff brush and with plenty of water.
  2. Soak the kombu in a small pot with 1/2 cup water for about half an hour. Add in the 1/2 cup of sake and turn on to high heat
  3. Once everything comes to a boil, remove kombu and add garlic
  4. When the water boils again, add clams and cook over high heat. Add scallions, soy sauce and Mirin. Give the pot a whirl at regular intervals as the re-shuffling gives more space for the clams to open when they are cooked. It probably takes no longer than a few minutes for all the clams to be cooked. When all the clams have opened (or you’re sure that all the good ones should have opened), remove from heat, and throw away any clams that didn’t open (they have probably gone bad).

More clam recipes:

豉椒炒蜆 Clams in Black bean Sauce

Spaghetti with White Clam Sauce

 

Tags: , , , , ,