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Category Archives: Chinese

孜然雞翼 Soy Cumin Chicken Wings

 

Ingredients:

  • 15 medium mid-joint chicken wings
  • 1 teaspoon soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon oyster sauce
  • 1 tablespoon dark soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 2 tablespoon ginger juice
  • 2 tablespoon cumin powder
  • Dash of white pepper

Directions:

  1. Defrost chicken wings.   Clean and pat dry with paper towel.
  2. Combine the first 7 ingredients with chicken, marinate for couple hours in the refrigerator, preferably overnight for the best flavor.
  3. Heat skillet and pour in 1 tablespoon oil.  Put in chicken wings and fry until light brown.  Cook over medium heat for 8 minutes, then flip the chicken wings over and cook for another 8 minutes until cooked through. Do not use too high heat as otherwise you’ll have burnt skin but raw meat inside. Stir in cumin powder and white pepper. Lightly pan fry for another minute.
 

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Roasted Pork Belly 脆皮燒肉


Pork F1

Pork J12

Ingredients:

  • 1.5 lb pork belly
  • 1 tablespoon vinegar
  • 2 teaspoon shaoxing wine
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 2 tablespoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon five spice powder

Pork A12Pork B1Pork C1Pork D1Pork E1

Directions:

  1. In a pot of boiling water, blanch the pork skin for 30 seconds.  Pat dry with a paper towel.
  2. Using a small fork, pierce little holes all over the skin.  This will let the water out so the pork skin will be crispy. Make sure that the entire area of the skin is covered with holes and that the holes are very densely located to each other.
  3. Brush on a thin layer of vinegar on the skin.
  4. Combine the wine, sugar, salt, soy sauce and five spice powder in a shallow dish.
  5. Carefully combine the marinade with the pork on the meat side but do not let the skin touch any of the marinade.
  6. Refrigerate without lid for at least 4 hours, preferably overnight for the best flavor.
  7. Place the pork on a roasting grill rack/pan.  Roast for 30 minutes at 400 degrees. Then broil for 5 minutes until the skin cracks up and becomes crispy.
  8. Let the pork sit for 15 minutes or until cool before slicing into bite sized pieces.

Source: 脆皮燒腩仔

 
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Posted by on March 1, 2015 in Chinese, Pork

 

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Bandit Chicken Legs 土匪雞脾

The main draw of this dish is the intense smell and flavor of cumin. Apparently, the source of the name is that in ancient times, Hunan bandits looted people’s homes, including all of their spices. The bandits used the spices to roast chicken, and so when people can smell the fragrance of this dish, they knew that the bandits are nearby! It is more common for this recipe to be used for wings, but I’ve found that it works equally well on drumsticks.

IMG_65371

Ingredients:

  • 8 chicken legs
  • 2 tablespoon cumin powder
  • 2 teaspoons 5 spices powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  • 2 tablespoons Hua Tiao Wine
  • 2 teaspoons soy sauce
  • 2 teaspoons dark soy sauce
  • 2 teaspoons sesame oil
  • Dash of white pepper

Source: http://www.karentsui.net/?p=724

IMG_6529

Directions:

  1. Clean and pat dry chicken legs with paper towel
  2. In a small bowl, mix together all ingredients except chicken.
  3. Combine the sauce with chicken and marinate for an hour. If the chicken legs are not completely covered by the marinade, try to flip them over every now and then.
  4. Bake in the oven for 25 minutes at 400°F (205°C) until the internal temperature of the chicken is 165°F (74°C).

 

 
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Posted by on February 8, 2015 in Baking Recipes, Chicken, Chinese

 

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紅豆年糕 New Year Red Bean Cake

紅豆年糕 New Year Red Bean Cake

年糕, or “nian gao”, is a type of food made with glutinous rice. It is commonly prepared and eaten during Chinese New Year. There are 2 main types of nian gao, the Shanghainese style, which is prepared as a savory dish, and the Cantonese style, which is typically a sweet food that is pan fried for a crispy exterior and sticky interior. The preparation for the Cantonese style is presented here.

Some people like to just have it plain, but personally I like it with a filling. The cake it self is only lightly sweetened so that the sweetness is not overwhelming. With the sweeter red bean filling, the level of sweetness is just right.

After the nian gao is prepared and put into the fridge, the pan frying process is also very important when you’re ready to eat it. The key is the slice it in thin slices, about 0.5 centimeter thick, dip it in some whipped eggs, and pan fry under a small amount of oil under low heat. The key is to heat it all the way through so that you have soft interior and crispy, but not burnt, exterior.


Ingredients:

  • 1 pack of red beans
  • 1 lb of Rice Flour 糯米粉
  • 2.5 oz of Dried Wheat Starch 澄麵 (about 1/6 of the package)
  • 3.5 pieces/sticks of sugar cane

Directions:

  1. Soak red beans overnight in a pot of water.  Bring it to boil and simmer for an hour.  Turn off the heat and cover for 2 hours.  Repeat the process for two times until the beans are soft.   At the last simmer, add about 1 cup of brown sugar or 2 pieces of sugar canes.  Drain and reserve the liquid.
  2. Melt 3 sugar canes with the liquid from red bean (about 2 cups).  Remove from heat and let the ”sugar water” cool down.
  3. Place the rice flour and dried wheat starch in a large bowl.  Slowly stir in the “sugar water”.  Add more water if the mixture is too thick, but only add enough water that allows you to stir.
  4. Slowly stir in red beans, be careful not to break them apart.
  5. Lightly grease the pan with oil and pour the mixture in there.  Steam for 1.5 hour (for a  9″ Round Cake Pan) or until the edges of the cake pull away from the pan. *This recipe makes two 9” round cake pans of red bean cake.
  6. Remove the cake from the heat and cool.  Then cut them into square slices.
  7. Heat oil in a skillet over high heat.  Dip the slices in egg wash and pan fry each side over low heat for 2-3 minutes or until the slices is soft inside.

 

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蜜汁叉燒肉 Honey Roasted Pork

Honey roast pork, or char siu in Cantonese, is one of iconic dishes of Cantonese cuisine. It is a type of “siu mei”, which is a general term for roasted meats (typically roasted pork, duck, or chicken). “Char siu” itself literally translates into “forked roast”, which alludes to how it is prepared traditionally – strips of pork that is skewered and roasted over a fire. In fact, a rough benchmark for how “authentic” a Chinese restaurant is can be determined by how the “siu mei” is served. If it is skewered up and prominently displayed in the front window, that is usually a good sign of the quality of the food served in the restaurant.

Nowadays, it is very easy to make your own roasted pork at home now with pre-made Chinese Barbecue sauce. But since I have all the necessary types of sauces at home, I decided to make the sauce from scratch.  After marinating for 8 hours and roasting in the oven for 35 minutes, the meat was still very tender and flavorful.  I thought the color also looks great without using any food coloring.

Ingredients:

  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce or dark soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon oyster sauce
  • 1 tablespoon Hoisin sauce
  • 1 tablespoon rose cooking wine – 玫瑰露酒 or rice wine
  • 3 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 cloves minced garlic
  • 4 tablespoons honey
  • dash of salt
  • 1 square/bricks Red Fermented Bean Curd 南乳
  • 1/2 teaspoon Five Spice powder
  • 0.7 lb of pork tenderloin

Directions:

  1. Combine all ingredients above except pork in a small bowl.
  2. Pour the marinade over the pork. Allow the pork to marinate for at least 8 hours in refrigerator, preferably overnight for the best flavor. (You may want to pierce the pork with a fork to allow the marinade to seep as deep as possible into the pork.)
  3. Place the pork on a roasting grill rack/pan.  Roast for 20 minutes at 350 degrees. Make sure you have some kind of pan underneath to catch the drippings.
  4. Flip it over, apply 1/2 teaspoon honey and roast for another 10 minutes.
  5. Apply 1/2 teaspoon honey and roast for 3 more minutes.
  6. Let the pork sit for 15 minutes or until cool before slicing into bite sized pieces.
  7. The liquid left from the marinade can be cooked and used as a dipping sauce.

 
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Posted by on January 21, 2012 in Chinese, Meat & Poultry Recipes, Pork

 

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檸汁薑黃雞 Lemon Turmeric Chicken

Turmeric is used in many South and South East Asian dishes. The turmeric plant is in the same family as ginger so similarly the root is the part that is typically eaten. Fresh turmeric is less commonly available, so usually it is used in a dried powder form. The vibrant yellow color can make almost any dish seem more appetizing, and in fact, turmeric is the ingredient that makes curry powder yellow. Be careful when you work with turmeric, as stains may be difficult to get rid of!

Ingredients:

  • 3/4 lb chicken breast, cut into bite sizes
  • 1 small onion, diced
  • 1/2 bell pepper, diced
  • 1 small tomato, diced
  • 3 tablespoons corn
  • 1.5 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1.5 and 0.5 tablespoons turmeric (used in different steps)
  • 1 teaspoon corn starch
  • Juice and zest of half a lemon
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1 tablespoon oyster sauce

Directions:

  1. Marinate chicken pieces with soy sauce, sugar, 1.5 tbsp turmeric and cornstarch.  Place in fridge for 30 minutes.
  2. Heat oil in skillet over high heat.  Stir in chicken pieces and cook for about 3-4 minutes until the meat begins to brown on the outside. Remove from skillet.
  3. Add oil to skillet.  Stir in onion, cook for 2 minutes.  Add pepper and stir-fry for 2 more minutes.  Add corn, tomato, oyster sauce, 1/2 tbsp turmeric, lemon juice and lemon zest.  Lastly, stir in chicken, mix well and serve.

 

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滑蛋蝦仁 Scrambled Eggs With Shrimp

Ready in less than 30 minutes with two ingredients.  This easy to prepare dish is a weeknight favorite

The key for this dish is simple – do not overcook! We want the egg to be creamy and melt in your month, not dry and rubbery. After the shrimps turn pink, you want to lower the heat and pour the eggs on top.  Turn up the heat quickly, and once the curds start to form on the side (see picture on the right below), stir quickly.  Continue to stir almost constantly until the eggs are just done. There should still be a small amount of liquid egg when you transfer it to your serving dish – the egg will continue for a bit more by itself from the heat.

Ingredients:

  • 12 raw shrimps, peeled and deveined
  • 1 teaspoon corn starch
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 3 large eggs
  • 1 tablespoon sesame oil
  • Chopped fresh cilantro leaves for garnish, optional
Directions:
  1. Marinate the shrimps with one tablespoon of egg white, salt and corn starch.
  2. In a separate bowl, beat eggs with salt and pepper
  3. Heat oil in a skillet over medium high heat. Cook shrimps on both sides until opaque.  Turn the heat to low. Add eggs, turn the heat back to high, and fold eggs over themselves. Remove the skillet from heat when eggs are just cooked.
 
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Posted by on November 10, 2011 in Chinese, Quick & Easy Recipes

 

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豆腐魚肚酸辣湯 Hot and Sour Soup with Fish Maw

Nothing beats a cold day like a hot bowl of homemade soup.  This hot and sour soup will awake your taste buds and warm up your stomach in the cold weather.  I used a homemade chicken stock in the recipe below, but a box of chicken stock would also work in a pinch and save you 1.5 hours of cooking time. Shiitake mushrooms and bamboo shoots are often used for this soup which can be added here as well. On the other hand, bean sprouts is an unconventional ingredient for this recipe, but it is actually my favorite addition. As you can probably tell, it is a very versatile soup and you can adjust some of the ingredients to your liking.

Ingredients:

  • 1 box of silken tofu
  • 1 lb of skinless chicken breast or 3 cups of chicken broth
  • 2 pieces of ginger
  • 1 piece of fried fish maw
  • 1 cup of dried Wood Ear
  • 2 carrots, peeled and chopped into chunks
  • 1/2 carrot, shredded
  • 2 cups of bean sprouts
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 4 tablespoon Chinese black vinegar,  Zhenjiang vinegar 鎮江醋, or balsamic vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon white pepper – (adjust to your taste for spiciness)
  • 3 tablespoons sweet potato starch or corn starch
  • 1 egg
  • 3 tablespoon cilantro, chopped

Fried Fish Stomach/Swim Bladder/Fish maw Preparation:

In a pot of hot boiling water, add 2 slices of ginger and fish maw.  Let it cook over high heat for 20 minutes.  Turn off the heat and cover for 30 minutes.  Drain and cut into 2 inches a piece.

Directions:

  1. Soak wood ear in hot water and let sit for 20 minutes.  Clean and remove any hard parts with scissors.  Cut into strips.
  2. Prepare chicken stock – bring a pot of water (5 cups) to boil. Add chicken, carrots chucks, and ginger to the pot.  When it comes to boil again, lower the heat and simmer for 1.5 hours.
  3. Remove chicken, carrots, and ginger from the pot.
  4. Bring the soup to boil over high heat.  Add carrots, wood ear and fish maw.  When it comes to boil again, lower the heat and simmer for 5 minutes.
  5. Cut the tofu into strips.  When it boils again, stir in tofu.  Add soy sauce, vinegar and pepper.
  6. When it boil again, add bean sprouts, cook for 30 seconds.
  7. In a small bowl, mix the starch with 2 tablespoons of water.  Stir into the pot of soup slowly to thicken the soup.  You may add more starch mixture until desired consistency is reached.
  8. Lastly, turn off the heat.  Crack the egg and stir quickly.  Add cilantro, sesame oil and chili oil for your taste.  Serve while it is still very hot.
Related Post:
 
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Posted by on November 2, 2011 in Chinese, Soup Recipes

 

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海參南瓜盅 Sea Cucumber in Pumpkin Shell

This home grown Japanese pumpkin (Kabocha) from Yim’s garden came in just in time for my Chinese style Halloween dish.

Before cooking this dish, I have never had pumpkin with sea cucumber before so I didn’t really know what to expect. They turn out to match very well – the fluffy texture of the pumpkin is a great accompaniment to the springiness of the sea cucumber. The pumpkin also has a natural sweet taste that nice balances the savoriness of the dish very well.

Ingredients:

  • 1 small Japanese pumpkin
  • 1 sea cucumber, chopped into 1.5 inch pieces
  • 4 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 2 slices ginger
  • 3 cups chicken stock
  • 3 slices of dried ham 金華火腿
  • 1 tablespoon oyster sauce
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 2 scallions, chopped into 2 inch pieces
Directions:
  1. Follow Sea Cucumber Cleaning Direction to prepare the cucumber or use pre-soaked sea cucumber. Set aside.
  2. Heat oil in pan. Add ginger and garlic and cook until fragrant. Add in sea cucumbers and stir fry for 3 minutes.
  3. Transfer the ingredients to a cooking pot. Add 1 tbsp oyster sauce, sugar, dried ham, and 3 cups of chicken stock (enough to cover the ingredients). Bring to a boil and reduce the heat to medium-low. Cover and simmer for 2.5 hours. Separate sea cucumber with the sauce and set aside.
  4. Cut top off the pumpkin and remove seeds and pulp. Extract some pumpkin meat and set aside. Place the pumpkin on a plate or aluminum foil and set the plate on top of a wide-mouth wok or large skillet as the base with a metal stand to balance. Make sure the water is about 1 inch beneath the plate. Cover and steam over boiling water for 20 minutes or until cooked.  Do not overcook or the pumpkin will break apart.
  5. In a saucepan, cook the sea cucumber sauce with the pumpkin meat extracted earlier for 10 minutes or until softened.
  6. Fill the pumpkin with sea cucumber.  Drizzle the pumpkin sauce on the side to serve.
 
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Posted by on October 30, 2011 in Chinese

 

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紅燒魷魚 Braised Whole Squid

While the dish is named “braised” squid, the cooking time is actually very short. Squid, like some other seafood, can be cooked very quickly until just done, or can be simmered for a long period of time until very tender.  Anything in between, and the squid will be very tough, with a rubber band texture.

There are three main steps in the preparation of the dish, and it is important to understand them as the cooking time is quite short. Firstly, the squid is quickly stir fried under high heat. Secondly, seasonings and water is added to begin the braising process. Lastly, the squid is removed when it is just cooked through, and use a thickening agent (corn starch) to prepare the sauce with the cooking liquid

Ingredients:

  • 3 medium size squids
  • 1.5 tablespoon grated ginger
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 3-4 Chinese star anise 八角
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon dark soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon rock sugar
  • 1 red birdeye chili, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon Chinese cooking wine – Hua Diao 花雕酒
  • 1 green onion/scallions, chopped

Directions:

  1. Remove head and cut right below the eyes, keeping the tentacles intact. Remove the beak and discard. Clean out insides
  2. Wash and pat dry the squids.
  3. Heat wok over high heat and pour in 1 tablespoon oil.  Add ginger and garlic, cook until fragrant.
  4. Add squid and lightly pan fry the squids on both sides, until the squids just turn opaque on the outside.
  5. Add cooking wine, rock sugar, star anise, birdeye chili, soy sauce, dark soy sauce and 1/2 cup of water.
  6. Bring it to boil, cook for a few minutes.  Remove squids from the wok when just cooked through
  7. Drain the mixture through a fine sieve into a bowl, reserving liquid; discard solids.
  8. Pour the mixture in a saucepan.  In a small bowl, combine 1 tablespoon of corn starch with 2 tablespoon of water.  Bring the mixture to boil.  Add the corn starch mixture to the saucepan.  Bring it to boil then remove from heat.
  9. Let the squids sit for 10 minutes or until cool before slicing into rings.
  10. Pour the sauce on top of the squids and sprinkle some chopped scallions to serve.

*If you’re using a large piece of rock sugar (see the size of the sugar from picture above), remove the rock sugar when it’s half-way melted, or the sauce will be too sweet.   It’s better to use the smaller piece of rock sugar that is just enough (about 1 tablespoon)

 

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